Tag Archives: facebook

Is XMPP for the web ready?

A discussion started recently on the Jabber social mailing-list about the current state of XMPP support at Facebook. If you don’t remember the idea of a XMPP network for Facebook I’d say it’s rather normal considering they talked about it back in May 2008 and nothing has really happened since then. The discussion has quickly drifted toward the difficulty XMPP knows to really make it big and you can sense some despair within the community.

It seems there are several reasons for this.

First and foremost, XMPP is rather poorly integrated within browsers. Today you have to be part of the browser if you want to succeed. Perhaps the response will come from the rather brilliant lib Strophe. Strophe uses BOSH to connect to XMPP services since Javascript doesn’t offer much access to the low level socket connection object. I hope in the future browsers will offer a built-in XMPP API that can be accessed from Javascript allowing to avoid using BOSH.

Second of all, we need big players to start accepting to let go and start entering Jabber federations so that interoperability actually works. I assume companies have yet to find a way on how they can exercise control over the data they might expose through XMPP whilst finding a way to monetize them.

Third I’d say there is a critical lack of PR around XMPP as an added value to the business. To be honest there is the same issue with AtomPub in my opinion. Both are fantastic technologies but they don’t sell by themselves and I find there is a lack of support from companies to support them. SOAP might have been a crap technology but it was backed up by large businesses that were competing with each other (for the worse one might argue).

Finally, and to me this is the most critical reason, XMPP doesn’t integrate well with the web in general. From the browser side as I suggested above to the fact that it’s rather hard to combine web application with jabber ones. Its definitely doable but requires some careful attention to your architecture. Jack Moffitt argues it’s not XMPP’s fault. It’s quite true as a protocol but I believe it’s not really the right way to invite web developers to push it one step further if you blame them for doing it wrong.

I believe XMPP has tremendous potential but it’s still has some way to go before it finds its place.

Facebook goes XMPP

Via Peter Saint-André we learn that facebook is adding XMPP as a mean to connect and use its services. Independently from what usage is made of Facebook this is a great news for the Jabber community in general and the protocol itself as it demonstrates that, unlike some nay-sayers used to claim in the past, XMPP will be the the true sibling to HTTP when it comes to social networking and delivering near real-time data on a large scale. Indeed, considering that media companies like the BBC, are looking at using too (even if it’s purely at a research level for now) it seems to me that XMPP has great years ahead.
I find that interesting though that Google, which has had a Jabber network for years now, has never been able to actually push much that way. I mean Orkut and Google Talk have been able to communicate for quite some time and yet it seems the Facebook prospect is more exciting for the Jabber community than Google’s usage ever was. Maybe it comes down to the fact Orkut is a pale shadow of Facebook.

On a personal level, I won’t complain that Google doesn’t push advertisement through Google Talk of course but one may wonder why it doesn’t do so from a business point of view. well probably they know having ads that way would drive their customers away, as they say (emphasis mine):

There are no ads in your chat sessions or your Quick Contacts list. Once a chat is saved, however, it becomes just like a Gmail message. And just as you may see relevant ads next to your Gmail messages, there now may be ads alongside your saved chats. Ads are only displayed when you’re viewing a saved chat, and as with all ads in Gmail, they are matched entirely by computers. Only ads classified as Family-Safe are shown and we are constantly improving our technologies to prevent displaying any inappropriate ads. One of the things many Gmail users have told us is how much they appreciate the unobtrusive text ads in Gmail, as opposed to the large, irrelevant, blinking banner ads they often see in other services, and many have even cited the usefulness of the ads in Gmail.

We’ll see how Facebook handles it considering the big fiasco Beacon was.

As a developer I’ve long felt frustrated at how limited the Google Talk standalone application is. Google Talk gadget is a bit better featured but it pains me having to use it when I prefer its big brother. Still both are very limited. To be fair though most well known IM clients speaking XMPP are limited in regards to what the protocol and its extensions offer. It’s sad so little support PubSub and even those that do are somewhat basic in their support.
Let’s hope we’ll more and more XMPP applications out of the context of instant messaging or with a larger scope like microblogging.

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